CALL TO SILENCE

 It's time to slow down and zip it on purpose--at least for this guy  

It's time to slow down and zip it on purpose--at least for this guy  

The article linked below from June of this year indicates, "The average American spends nearly half a day staring at a screen.  A new Nielsen Company audience report reveals that adults in the United States devoted about 10 hours and 39 minutes each day to consuming media during the first quarter of this year. The report...included how much time we spend daily using our tablets, smartphones, personal computers, multimedia devices, video games, radios, DVDs, DVRs and TVs."

http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/30/health/americans-screen-time-nielsen/

So, tomorrow, as best I can for at least the rest of the year:  I'm going to tithe the one o'clock hour to unplugged silence.  Monday thru Friday:  No calls no texts no Internet no feed checks.   Just Him and me and whoever else feels the nudge.

My hope would be to gather some steam to spiritually reverse the above-recognized trend.

You are welcome to join me.   

Not everyone's schedule will work for the one o'clock hour, obviously.

But I'm going to go--as best I can--to Lutheran Church of Hope, my church, our West Des Moines campus and sit--with whoever is there--and really try to just engage in listening to my Abba.

I have quiet time most everyday, in the early AM.   This isn't that.

There is something about investing our productivity time and listening corporately to His heart that makes me smile.  

Plus, I feel like it was His idea.

So, wherever you are--whether it is a minute at one or an hour at midnight or longer if you have it and feel so inclined--let's lean in and listen to the heart of Our Father--more than we check Facebook or play Minecraft or Tweet or Pick-a-News source or Netflix or even work and make calls.

I'm going to start in WDM tomorrow:  12/01 at one o'clock.

I don't want to be religious about it; I do want to invest my heart in it--slowing down, on purpose.

I keep thinking about George Washington Carver and how he would just wander outside and say, "Lord, the world is too big for me--tell me about the peanut."

And what the Lord showed him, literally, helped to save a soon-failing economy no one at that time saw coming.

Hope this finds you blessed and rested!

Megs