What's Philip's Question?

 Though it is not Philip's question, it is sometimes the question we wish someone was really asking.

Though it is not Philip's question, it is sometimes the question we wish someone was really asking.

When I lived for a short while in Costa Rica I became a proficient Spanglishista and I discovered a couple of great Tico (native Costa Rican) sayings:  the first was !Pura vida!  Which is shorthand for 'pure life'.

(Thanks to digi-pals at http://www.bestcostaricantours.com/about/puravida.html for the deeper dig):

"But where did Costa Ricans take this phrase from? According to a study of the expression, a film called Pura Vida came to Costa Rica from Mexico in 1956, directed by Gilberto Martinez Solares. In the movie, "Pura vida" is the expression of eternal optimism used by a comic character, played by the actor Antonio Espino, who unfortunately can't seem to do anything right. While a small population used it then, the phrase "Pura vida" was used nationwide by 1970.

Associated with many different English interpretations like "pure life", "take it easy", "enjoy life", "all good", "purity in life", "hello", "goodbye", "this is life!" and many many more. The point is that foreigners truly don't have a true grasp of the meaning of "pura vida" as they are not Costa Ricans themselves.

Pura vida! Means that no matter what your current situation is, life for someone else can always be less fortunate than your own. So you need to consider that maybe...just maybe, your situation isn't all that bad and that no matter how little or how much you have in life, we are all here together and life is short...so start living it "pura vida style."

Pura Vida:  Is there anywhere in your life it isn't?  Where you're struggling with what my friend Adam famously called, "selfish entitlement rooted in anger"?

Apologize, baby!  Or forgive; let it go:  pura vida.  Shakespeare said, "The time of life 'tis short, to spend it basely, 'twere too long."

Read this from my brilliant bride on how she got her joy back:

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The other magna-pregunta was 'How do you go?'  (?Como Te Va?).   Related, in that, hopefully, pura vida is how you roll.

I love how Spanish has an upside down question mark before their question to let you know a question is coming.  While I don't know how to make mine flip:  ?How do you go?  

I love a better question, I really do.

They're often the questions that catch you off guard.  

Not Philip's question, "How do you go?"

My son was being turkey-esque at the end-of-the-school year.  His sister was trying to help him with something and he was having none of it. 

When I finally remembered to stop judging him and just ask, Holy Spirit said, "It's not what you think it is.  Ask him Philip's question."

Philip's question is:  "How is you heart?"  You will rarely get out of or far into a chat with Philip without that question making an appearance.  And somedays it is tough to answer.

And when I asked my son how his heart was, the tears and the harsh realities of young life began to well up and out of him as we sat in the boat out on York Pond and I pretended to fish, while really learning again to care for and hear his heart.  Comfort sees and cares, those who know remind me.

People won't often answer questions they're not asked.

So, How is your heart?  Who needs you to ask them that?  Who do you need to ask you?

A friend of mine went to a higher learning mecca that rhymes with Oxford and one assignment called for sending someone who would know the answers a list of questions.  I didn't like them.  So, I said, I don't like these and I don't want to answer them so I'm not going to.  They were sort of shame-y 360 degree what areas do you suck questions that leaders are taught to ask all over the world.  I sent him back what I know to be better questions--how are you awesome and where are you rocking?  And what does God think about you?  To my conviction, we invest way too much daylight concerning ourselves with what we are not, what we don't have and what's wrong with us.

The leader of their group apparently moved past my questions and responses pretty quickly by pretending my friend had ignored the assignment.  

But my friend said, "Megs, do you know how they describe apologetics over there?"  My English accent is quite a bit better than my 3/4 box-step, but how they define apologetics, I admittedly didn't know.

He said, "Asking better questions."

Like I love "When was the last time you asked God the question He was asking you to ask Him?"

Between meetings I went for a walk on the railroad tracks a few weeks ago and I found all these pieces and spikes meant to fasten the railroad tracks to the ground littered every hundred yards or so. I felt like one of the boys in Stand By Me.   There was trash, there were flowers and bugs.  As I strolled, it became a sensory paradise.

And I realized I hadn't really been exploring in a few weeks: really looking a la Daniel.  Last time that stood out to me, my eldest and I were in Steamboat up in the mountains and my senses were ridiculously alive.  

 Loving Steamboat--the question is implied in the reminder I've set in my phone:  Make it memorable.  This waterfall isn't even halfway up the path to Long Lake and we would know.  We saw us hike it.

Loving Steamboat--the question is implied in the reminder I've set in my phone:  Make it memorable.  This waterfall isn't even halfway up the path to Long Lake and we would know.  We saw us hike it.

It is spiritual exercise which always involves our imagination and still deeper attention.  It is where you can hear the Holy Spirit whisper, "Did you catch that?" in the sudden breeze.

Just taking a few minutes to peer more closely at something you've passed by a zillion times. Closer.

 Aspens.  Wow.  Upon closer inspection, many of them have initials carved in them--and they whisper.  They sound like waters.  Supposedly King David would hang his harp in the trees and go to sleep listening to the strings played by the nght breeze.

Aspens.  Wow.  Upon closer inspection, many of them have initials carved in them--and they whisper.  They sound like waters.  Supposedly King David would hang his harp in the trees and go to sleep listening to the strings played by the nght breeze.

We so need it. It is how we learn to hear Him and each other.
There is hidden treasure out there; I guarantee it.  Get a metal detector or a magnifying glass.

The Bible says you don't have because you don't ask.

My challenge and question to cap off today is: are we asking, 

                 As Kings